We make art books that have a story to tell. Whether it’s our Familiars series – in which we invite artists to reimagine classic works of literature – or our new series, the Irregulars about fascinating pockets of British visual culture, we try to find art in the most intriguing and unusual places, and publish it as beautifully as we can.

Run by Elinor Jansz and Richard Embray, we’ve been publishing since 2003. We’re always keen to hear from you – whether you’re a reader, bookseller, historian, or artist, or have an idea you think we’d be interested in.

Contact

Four Corners Books

56 Artillery Lane
London E1 7LS

hello@fourcornersbooks.co.uk
+44 (0)20 7247 8948

Stockists

  • Arnolfini, Bristol
  • Artwords
  • La Biblioteka, Sheffield
  • Claire de Rouen
  • Design Museum
  • Donlon Books
  • Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh
  • ICA Bookshop
  • Koenig Books
  • Magma
  • Serpentine Gallery
  • Tate Britain
  • Tate Modern
  • Tenderbooks
  • Ti Pi Tin
  • Waterstones, Gower Street
  • Waterstones, Garrick Street
  • Waterstones, Piccadilly
  • Whitechapel Gallery

Credits

Design by John Morgan studio
Programming by Benedict de Silva
Pictures by Four Corners Books

News Archive

3.9.2017

Writer William Hogan and photographer David Titlow are the authors of our new book about British Citizens Band Radio Culture of the 1980s, and more specifically the Eyeball Cards – the business cards of ‘breakers’ exchanged when meeting up in person after chatting on the airwaves. We asked them about their own experience of the wonderful world of CB radio and Eyeball Cards.

Read the article
31.8.2017
We’re proud to introduce our newest project, one that we’ve been beavering away at for over a year now: Four Corners Irregulars, a series of books presenting a new look at the history of modern British visual culture. We have chosen a wide range of different subjects, ranging from politics to hobbies, and stretching from 1945 to the present day. All are linked by the remarkable visual creativity that has happened in Britain outside of art galleries and museums. Some of the artworks we will…

We’re proud to introduce our newest project, one that we’ve been beavering away at for over a year now: Four Corners Irregulars, a series of books presenting a new look at the history of modern British visual culture.

We have chosen a wide range of different subjects, ranging from politics to hobbies, and stretching from 1945 to the present day. All are linked by the remarkable visual creativity that has happened in Britain outside of art galleries and museums. Some of the artworks we will feature were made by people who wouldn’t have considered themselves artists, many more were, but who nevertheless chose to make their work seen outside of a traditional gallery context.

Each book will provide an overview of its subject, and together the books will add up to a portrait of our own histories – at times passionate, at others frivolous, but more complex and multifarious than the myths we sometimes tell ourselves about being British.

The first volume is by William Hogan and David Titlow, about Eyeball Cards, the mysterious business cards created by CB radio enthusiasts in the late 1970s and early 1980s. CB radio ‘breakers’ would chat over the airwaves at a time when the technology was yet to be legalised and, taking a lead from US CB culture, would create handles for themselves to help keep their identity a secret. It’s these invented identities that the Eyeball Cards immortalise, calling cards for ‘Lollipop’, ‘Rubber Duck’, and ’Blue Eyes’. These are amusing, occasionally mundane, dark or bawdy, but always personal creations — flotsam from a more innocent analogue world. The result is a window into an outpouring of creativity that prefigures online identities — social media handles before there was even an internet.

The book presents hundreds of the funniest, strangest and most intriguing Eyeball cards from across the UK. In addition, photographer David Titlow has taken portraits of some of the breakers who owned the cards, and writer William Hogan has written a lively history of how and why these cards came to exist.

Eyeball Cards will be published on 12 September, priced £14. It’s a hardback, with 192 pages. It’s Four Corners Irregular #1, and we’ll be announcing details of further books in the series over the coming weeks.

See the book
7.8.2017
Ipf17 Insta

Kiosk Independent Publishers Fair

This weekend (12 & 13 August, 2017) we will be at the Kiosk Independent Publishers Fair in Pekcham, London. Come and say hello.  Featured at the fair are the following outlets and publishers:  Actual Source Adolfo Arcades Magazine Bronze AgeClandestine BooksColophon Foundry CygnnetDittoFour Corners Books Fruitlands Zine Hato Press Heresy Hexus PressHi Bye StudioHotel Kiosk Migrant Journal Note Well Press Palm Studios People of Print The Photocopy club The Plantation Journal Roys Room Sabat…

This weekend (12 & 13 August, 2017) we will be at the Kiosk Independent Publishers Fair in Pekcham, London. Come and say hello. 

Featured at the fair are the following outlets and publishers: 

Actual Source 

Adolfo 

Arcades Magazine 

Bronze Age

Clandestine Books

Colophon Foundry

Cygnnet

Ditto

Four Corners Books 

Fruitlands Zine 

Hato Press 

Heresy 

Hexus Press

Hi Bye Studio

Hotel 

Kiosk 

Migrant Journal 

Note Well Press 

Palm Studios 

People of Print 

The Photocopy club 

The Plantation Journal

Roys Room 

Sabat Magazine

Shelf Heroes

Snöar Press 

Splash & Grab

Studio Operative

Varv Varv 

Whatever Press

Yasseen Faik For Iraq and Syria, a collaborative poster exhibition curated by designer, Yasseen Faik (which launched at KK Outlet in June) will be hung in the space for the duration of the fair. The fair will span across two days, open 12–8pm on Saturday August 12th and 12–6pm on Sunday 13th. Admission is free of charge. Kiosk IPF 2017 is proudly supported by Arts Council England.

Copeland Park & Bussey Building, 133 Copeland Road, SE15 3SN

1.3.2016
The cover of 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea, features tattoos by Liam Sparkes. We wanted to create a cover in keeping with the 19th century nautical theme of the book, and tattoos seemed the most natural way to do it. We were especially impressed with the tattoos of Liam Sparkes, who works out of Old Habits Tattoo on Kingsland Road. He created fresh artwork for us, inspired by themes and moments in the book,…

The cover of 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea, features tattoos by Liam Sparkes. We wanted to create a cover in keeping with the 19th century nautical theme of the book, and tattoos seemed the most natural way to do it. We were especially impressed with the tattoos of Liam Sparkes, who works out of Old Habits Tattoo on Kingsland Road. He created fresh artwork for us, inspired by themes and moments in the book, including the "N" Nautilus symbol, an underwater grave, a diving helmet, and a giant squid.

Liam's website is at liamsparkes.tumblr.com

See the book